2013 Golf Croquet Rules

(b)     At the end of a turn in which a hoop point was scored, any ball, all of which is resting beyond the halfway line for the next hoop in order is an offside ball unless it reached its position as a result of

(1)     the stroke just played; or

(2)     a stroke, wrong ball play or fault played or committed by an opponent, however this exemption does not apply to a ball whose owner misses a turn in that position because of a non-striking fault; or

(3)     contact with an opponent's ball, however this exemption does not result from a ball played away from an opponent’s ball with which it was in contact, unless it moves that ball in the stroke; or

(4)     being directed to a penalty spot.

Commentary on Rule 10(b):  Unless it can be clearly seen that all of a ball is over a halfway line, the ball should be ruled as not over the halfway line.

(c)(1) Before their next stroke is played, the opponent of the owner of an offside ball is entitled to direct that the offside ball is next to be played from either penalty spot D or E in Diagram 3 as chosen by the opponent.  A ball that is directed to be played from a penalty spot is an outside agency until it is played.  If the offside ball is not so directed it remains a ball in play.

Commentary on Rule 10(c)(1):  An offside ball only becomes an outside agency if it is directed to be played from a penalty spot.  Once it has been directed to be moved it may be left where it is, sent towards the penalty spot or placed on the spot.  However as an outside agency it is to be moved, at any player’s request, to avoid interference with play. A ball so directed remains an outside agency until it is played from the directed penalty spot.

(2)     If the owner of an offside ball plays before the opponent has given a direction under Rule 10(c)(1) and before the opponent has played, the opponent may require the stroke to be replayed after Rule 10(c)(1) is applied.  Before the stroke is replayed any balls moved by the first stroke are replaced.  A player required to replay a ball under this Rule is no longer entitled to rule on an opponent's offside ball at the same hoop.  Reference to play by the owner of an offside ball in this rule includes play by the partner in a doubles game and play of either of the owner’s balls in a singles game.

 

11.     Playing a Wrong Ball

(a)     If any player believes that a wrong ball may have been played, play should be stopped while the correct next play is discovered using this rule.

(b)     If in the last turn the striker, identified by Rule 1(e), has played any ball other than the striker’s ball, then a wrong ball has been played and

(1)     if the ball belongs to the striker, no points are scored for any ball, the ball and any other ball moved are replaced, and unless Rule 13 would have applied, the correct ball is played; or

(2)     if the ball does not belong to the striker, no points are scored for any ball and the opponent(s) may choose to have the balls replaced or left where they stopped and to restart the sequence with either ball of their side.

(c)      If in the last turn the striker’s partner has played, then a wrong ball has been played, and

(1)     if the ball belongs to the striker’s partner, no points are scored for any ball, the ball and any other ball moved are replaced and, unless Rule 13 would have applied, the correct ball is played, or

(2)     if the ball does not belong to the striker’s partner, no points are scored for any ball and the opponents may choose to have the balls replaced or left where they stopped and to restart the sequence with either ball of their side.

(d)     If in the last turn any other player has played, then a wrong ball has been played.  No points are scored for any ball and the opponent of the player of the wrong ball may choose to have the balls replaced or left where they stopped and to restart the sequence with either ball of their side.

(e)        If, when play is stopped, it is discovered that the last player had played a ball which belongs to them but that the previous stroke was played by the opponent with a ball that did not belong to their side, then the last stroke condones the previous error and all points scored in these strokes are valid, subject to Rule 13.  Play then continues by the opponent playing the ball that follows in sequence from the ball played last.

(f)      If one or more wrong balls have been played but play is not stopped immediately then all points scored are counted for the owner of the relevant balls and play continues until the game ends or a wrong ball play is identified.  Only the wrong ball play discovered immediately before play is stopped is dealt with, using Rule 11 (b), (c), or (d) as appropriate.

(g)     If a sequence of wrong ball plays is followed by a ball played in sequence, all of the play is condoned, and play is to continue in sequence.

(h)     A player or referee should forestall a player if the player is about to play a stroke to which Rule 11(b)(1) or Rule 11(c)(1) would apply, but in no other circumstances.

12.     Non-striking Faults

(a)     A non-striking fault is committed if a moving ball touches any part of a player, or the player`s mallet, clothing or personal property, or a player touches, moves or shakes a stationary ball, with any part of the body, clothes or mallet either directly or by hitting a hoop or the peg, except when:

(1)     the striker touches the striker`s ball with the mallet when playing a stroke; or

(2)     a player touches a ball in accordance with these Rules or marks or cleans it with the permission of the opponent or referee; or

(3)     a player plays a wrong ball; or

(4)     the ball is an outside agency.

Commentary on Rule 12(a)(1):  If while attempting to play a stroke the striker touches another ball with the mallet, body or clothes, before hitting the striker's ball, the non-striking fault coming first cancels the stroke.  In effect the striker has not had a turn.  See also Rule 12(c)(4).  Any balls moved in this play, whether directly from the touch on another ball or from the resulting hit on the striker's ball, are subject to the opponent's choice under Rule 12(c)(1).  As the striker's attempt to play the turn is cancelled the same player is still the striker. The turn the striker loses under Rule 12(c)(4) is the turn the striker has attempted to play.  The owner of the next ball in sequence becomes the striker.  There is no further penalty.  This is addressed again in the commentary on Rule 13(a)(12)&(13).

(b)     A non-striking fault is also committed if a player causes damage to the court that, before it is repaired, is capable of affecting a subsequent stroke played over the damaged area, except when the striker is playing a stroke.

Commentary on Rule 12(b):  This includes damage in an air swing, or any careless use of mallet, feet or other equipment.  Damage that breaks or dents the surface, so that a ball rolled gently over the damage may change direction, would be a fault.  Damage that scuffs the surface but would not cause a ball to change direction is not a fault, nor is damage outside the boundary of the court.  A referee or a player should immediately repair such damage, although the assessment is made before the damage is repaired.

(c)      Action after a non-striking fault

(1)     If a non-striking fault affects one or more stationary balls, the opponent chooses whether to leave them where they stop or to have them all replaced where they were before the fault was committed.

(2)     If a non-striking fault affects a moving ball, the opponent chooses whether to leave the ball and any other balls moved because of the fault where they stop, or to have the moving ball placed where it would have stopped and the other balls moved replaced where they were before the fault was committed.  However, if the outcome of the stroke was in doubt when a non-striking fault committed by the striker’s opponent occurred, the stroke is to be played again.

Commentary on Rule 12(c)(2):  (i) The option to replace any balls moved after a non-striking fault applies only to balls moved because of the fault.

(ii) The outcome of a stroke affected by a non- striking fault is in doubt if there was a reasonable chance that the ball would have finished in a critical position (hoop running or blocking position), would have cleared a ball from a critical position or would have run a hoop.  If there is little chance of one of these happening then the outcome is not in doubt, even though the exact finishing position would be unknown.

(3)     No points may be scored by any ball by a non-striking fault.

(4)     The side that commits the non-striking fault loses its next turn.  Should a non-striking fault be committed by the striker’s side, before the striker’s turn is played, then the turn lost is the current turn.

(5)     If a non-striking fault is committed but play is not stopped before the opponent has played a stroke there is no remedy, and play continues as if the fault had not been committed.

Commentary on Rule 12 (c)(5):  This rule says there is no remedy if play is not stopped after a non-striking fault and before the opponent plays.  But Rule 12(c)(3) does not permit a hoop to be scored by such an action.  It is unlikely that a non-striking fault that was not noticed immediately would cause a ball to run the hoop in order.  However, if this did happen and was noticed when the ball’s owner came to play it, Rule 12(c)(5) says there is no remedy so the offender does not miss a turn, and Rule 6(j) says the ball is to be moved back to its agreed position (not through the hoop).

 

13. Striking Faults

(a)     A striking fault can only be committed from the time the striker’s ball is struck by the mallet until the striker leaves the stance under control.  It is a fault if, in striking, the striker:

(1)     touches the head of the mallet with a hand;

(2)     rests the shaft of the mallet or a hand or arm on the ground or an outside agency;

(3)     rests the shaft of the mallet or a hand or arm directly connected with the stroke against any part of the legs or feet;

(4)     causes the mallet to strike the striker’s ball by kicking, hitting, dropping or throwing the mallet;

(5)     strikes the striker's ball with any part of the mallet other than an end face,

either (i) deliberately; or (ii) accidentally in a stroke which requires special care because of the proximity of a hoop or the peg or another ball;

(6)     "double taps" the striker’s ball by striking it more than once in the same stroke or allows the striker’s ball to retouch the mallet;

(7)     causes the striker’s ball to touch a hoop or the peg while still in contact with the mallet;

(8)     causes the striker’s ball while still in contact with the mallet, to touch another ball, unless the balls were in contact before the stroke;

(9)     strikes the striker’s ball when it lies in contact with a hoop upright or the peg otherwise than in a direction away therefrom;

(10)   moves or shakes a ball at rest by hitting a hoop or peg with the mallet or any part of the body or clothes;

(11)   maintains contact with the striker’s ball by pushing or pulling the ball with the mallet;

(12)   touches a ball other than the striker's ball with the mallet;

(13)   touches a ball with any part of the body or clothes;

(14)   plays before the previous turn ends;

(15)   plays any stroke in which the mallet causes damage to the court that, before it is repaired, is capable of affecting a subsequent turn played over the damaged area.

Commentary on Rule 13(a: The striking period ends when the striker 'leaves the stance under control'.  This is a matter for the referee to decide and is intended to penalise a striker who plays a stroke in such a way that a ball is likely to rebound onto the mallet or clothing and, to avoid this, jumps out of the way and lands or falls on yet another ball.  There are three cases where the striker is not under control:

(1) jumping to avoid a moving ball

(2) playing in an off balance position and falling out of the stance;

(3) disturbing a ball he was trying to avoid when leaving a stance restricted (or changed) because of the presence of another ball.

Providing the striker's body leaves the stance under control the striking period can be considered to end when the striker begins to withdraw the mallet after the stroke.  If the mallet touches another ball or causes one to move by touching a hoop while being withdrawn in control such a touch is a non-striking fault, and the stroke stands.  However, if the mallet touches a ball or causes one to move by hitting a hoop, while the striker is leaving the stance without control, a striking fault is committed (Rule 13(a)(10) or (12)) and the hoop would not count.

Commentary on Rule 13(a)(4):  Although a striking fault can occur only after the striker’s ball is struck, and the actions covered by this rule occur before then, it is when the ball is struck as a result of one of these actions that it becomes such a fault.

Commentary on Rule 13(a)(6):  A “double tap” is likely to occur if a gentle shot is played with excessive follow through, or if a hard shot is played along the line of two balls close together. In the latter case if the two balls are less than 5cm apart a hard shot is likely to cause a “double tap”, even if played as a stun shot. Played with follow through a “double tap” may occur even if the balls are 15 cm or more apart. The excessive distance travelled by the striker’s ball will indicate this. Playing at an angle to the line of centres will reduce the likelihood of a “double tap”.

Commentary on Rules 13(a)(12) & (13):  Note that if the striker’s mallet or body touches another ball before hitting the striker’s ball a non-striking fault is committed. If the mallet or body touches another ball after hitting the striker’s ball but before leaving the stance a striking fault is committed. Under these rules both have the same consequences, so the distinction in this case is no longer important, except for Rules 16(f) and (g). If the contact occurs after the striker has left their stance then the stroke is valid, any points made are scored, but a non-striking fault has subsequently occurred.

Commentary on Rule 13(a)(15):  See the comment on Rule 12(b), but note that for this damage to be a striking fault it must be caused by the mallet. Damage caused by a ball is not a striking fault.

(b)     Action after a striking fault

(1)     If the fault is noticed before the opponent has played a stroke the opponent chooses whether the balls remain where they stop after the fault or are replaced in the positions they occupied before the fault was committed.  In either case no point is scored for any ball.

(2)     Otherwise there is no remedy, and play continues as if the fault had not been committed.

(3)     If a player commits a non-striking fault on a ball that is still moving after a striking fault has been committed by the other side, any balls moved are to be replaced where they were before the striking fault was committed and the side that committed the non-striking fault loses its next turn.

Commentary on Rule 13(b)(3):  When a player commits a striking fault and then, while one of the balls is still moving, it hits an opponent a non-striking fault has also occurred. As both sides are entitled to direct where the balls are to be played from, this rule resolves the conflict. However, should a player commit a striking fault and then the same player or the partner commit a non-striking fault on a ball still moving, Rules 12(c) and 13(b)(1) cover both faults without contradiction.

 

14.     Etiquette

(a)     Players are responsible for maintaining good standards of behaviour towards other players, equipment, courts and spectators.  Examples of unacceptable behaviour for which players may be penalised include, but are not limited to, cases where a player:

(1)     leaves the vicinity of the court during a match without permission from the opponent, referee or the manager.

(2)     offers tactical advice to an opponent during a match.

(3)     physically abuses their mallet or other equipment

(4)     disturbs other players during the match by talking, making noises, standing or moving in front of the striker, except as permitted or required by the rules.

(5)     argues aggressively or continuously with or is aggressive towards another player.

(6)     fails to accept a decision of a referee on a matter of fact or shows lack of respect for a referee.

(7)     knowingly or repeatedly plays the partner ball.

(8)     wastes time.  Players are to play with reasonable dispatch.  The striker is to play within 1 minute of the last turn ending, except where the game is held up while a ball is retrieved or a referee called.

Commentary on Rule 14(a)(8):  (i)A player may request that a referee, spectator, (or in the absence of these) a player, be appointed to time turns for all players.  This "time-keeper" may be later dismissed during the game by mutual consent of the players.

(ii)  This rule does not give players permission to wait for 1 minute before playing. Rather it is intended to prevent excessive deliberation before playing.

(9)     plays after the opponent has clearly asked that play is stopped to enable an action to be investigated or a ball to be placed.

(10)   places a mark or marker to assist the striker in gauging the strength or direction of a stroke.

(11)   except with the permission of an opponent or referee, attempts to perform a physical test to determine whether a point has been scored or may be scored.

(12)   provides wrong information to an opponent when asked in accordance with Rule 8(b).

(13)   attempts to repair lawn damage that may indicate a fault, before it is ruled on by a referee or opponent.

(14)   smokes or drinks alcohol during a game.

(15)   acts in such a manner that may bring the game into disrepute.

(b)     When a referee is in charge of a match and a player behaves in any unacceptable way the referee is to warn the player not to do so again. If, during the same match, the offending side repeats the behaviour or another unacceptable behaviour, the referee is to stop the match and the next player on the offending side loses their turn.  After a further occurrence of unacceptable behaviour in the same match, by the same side, the referee is to stop the match and award it to the opposing side.  In this case the score in the match in progress is recorded as the winning total (4, 7 or 10) to the winner and the score already recorded by the loser when the game is stopped.  Any subsequent games in the match are won to zero.

(c)      In the absence of a referee the players are responsible for monitoring behaviour during a match.  If a player behaves in any unacceptable way the opponent is to draw attention to the behaviour, and issue a warning not to do so again.  If the players are unable to agree that the player has behaved unacceptably the game should be stopped until a referee has ruled on the situation.  The referee may rule that the next player on the offending side loses their next turn, and may rule that any repetition of that or another unacceptable behaviour will result in loss of the match.

Commentary on Rule 14(c)  This rule places a lot of responsibility on the shoulders of the players involved. Where possible any disagreement should be resolved amicably, otherwise a referee should be called.

 

15.     Refereeing

(a)     The players in all matches are responsible for the fair and correct application of these Rules.  A referee may be placed in charge of a match, or may be called on to assist, or may in specific instances intervene to ensure the match proceeds according to these Rules.  The presence or absence of a referee does not change the obligation on a player to follow fair and correct play.  Players are to warn the other side before playing strokes that may produce a fault or that are forceful.  In the absence of a referee, if there is a difference of opinion on a matter of fact, the opinion of the player with the best view is to be preferred, but if two views are equal, the striker’s opinion prevails.

(b)     Regulations governing the appointment, powers and duties of referees are contained in the WCF Refereeing Regulations.  Where a referee is not available the players are joint referees for the match.

16.     Handicaps

(a)      Handicap games may be played to allow players of different abilities to compete so that they will have more equal chances of success.  Rules 1 to 15 above apply except as indicated in this Rule.  Each player is allotted a handicap according to ability, ranging from zero for the strongest players up to 12 for the weakest players.

Commentary on Rule 16(a)  National Croquet Associations  where handicap matches are played may choose to vary the range of handicaps used in their matches.

(b)     In singles the weaker player is allowed a number of extra turns equal to the difference between the players’ handicaps for 13 point games and as shown in the table for 7 and 19 point games. 

Extra Turns Allowed in Handicap Singles Games

Handicap difference

19 Point Game

13 Point Game

7 Point Game

0

0

0

0

1

2

1

1

2

3

2

1

3

5

3

2

4

6

4

2

5

8

5

3

6

9

6

3

7

10

7

4

8

12

8

4

9

13

9

5

10

15

10

5

11

17

11

6

12

19

12

7

(c)      In doubles extra turns are given to a player, not a side.  The lower (smaller) handicap on each side is subtracted from the higher handicap on the other side, and the difference is halved.  The table below shows the number of extra turns available to the higher handicapped player in each comparison.  When two players on the same side have the same handicap, they decide in advance which will be considered the lower handicapped player for the application of this rule. 

Extra Turns Allowed in Handicap Doubles Games

 

 

   

Half handicap difference

19 point game

13 point game

7 point game

0

0

0

0

0.5

1

1

0

1

2

1

1

1.5

2

2

1

2

3

2

1

2.5

4

3

1

3

5

3

2

3.5

5

4

2

4

6

4

2

4.5

7

5

2

5

8

5

3

5.5

8

6

3

6

9

6

3

(d)     No point may be scored for the striker’s side in an extra turn.

(e)      An extra turn may only be played by a striker at the end of that striker’s turn and is to be played with the same ball.  A striker may play an extra turn at any stage in the game, and, if receiving more than one, may play extra turns in succession.

(f)      At the end of a turn a striker intending to take an extra turn is to give a clear indication of the intention and stop the opponent from playing.  When a striker decides to play an extra turn after committing a striking fault, Rule 13(b)(1) does not apply and the balls are replaced in the positions they occupied before the fault was committed.  A striker who is entitled to play an extra turn and indicates an intention to do so may revoke that decision at any time before playing the stroke, unless the balls have been replaced after a striking fault.  The striker's intention not to play an extra turn shall be indicated clearly.  A striker who has indicated that an extra turn will not be played is not permitted to change that decision.

(g)     An extra turn may not be taken in place of a turn missed because of a non-striking fault or the playing of a wrong ball.  If such an extra turn is played and play is stopped before the opponent plays then any balls moved are replaced, the opponent then plays and the right to the extra turn is restored to the owner.  However, if such an extra turn is played, and the opponent then plays before play is stopped, the extra turn stands as valid play.

(h)     The administration of the handicap system is the responsibility of each National Croquet Association.

Appendix to the WCF Golf Croquet Rules 2013

Regulations for an Automatic Handicapping System

This Appendix describes a system used to administer a Handicapping system for use with the WCF GC Rules.  National Croquet Associations who play competitive handicap matches may choose to adopt the system as described here, to modify it to better suit their needs or to produce their own Regulations for handling handicaps.  In the latter case, National Croquet Associations may select what is appropriate from these regulations.

As in many handicapping systems a Golf Croquet handicap serves two functions.  The self-evident one is to provide more opportunity for players to compete successfully against stronger players in special handicap competitions.  The second purpose is to enable players to be placed in divisions or grades where they may compete against players of similar abilities.

1.       Using handicaps in play

In matches where handicap play is being used, Rule 16 of the WCF Rules applies.

2.       An Automatic Handicap System for Golf Croquet

Handicaps are initially set for each player using paragraphs 3 or 4 below.  Thereafter they are changed automatically based on player’s success in both singles and doubles games as described in paragraph 5 below.  Non- automatic changes in handicaps may also be made as described in paragraph 6 below.

3.       Setting initial handicaps for players new to any form of croquet

Players who are new to croquet may have their initial handicap set by the following procedure.  Start from the fourth corner and count the number of strokes taken to run hoops one to six inclusive.  Complete this exercise three times to the best of their ability.  The total number of strokes over the three rounds is the grading score.  This score is used to assess their handicap and index from Table A below.

Table A

   

Grading score

Initial Index

Initial handicap

less than 70

100

10

70 to 80

50

11

more than 80

0

12

This will not be an accurate handicap as it measures only some of the skills and tactics needed.  Players should initially play with this handicap and the automatic system will eventually obtain a correct value.  Note that players should not be started automatically on 12, and it would be unusual to start a new player on less than 10.

4.       Setting initial Golf Croquet handicaps for players with an Association Croquet handicap

Players who start Golf Croquet with Association Croquet experience may have their handicaps and initial index set by Table B.  The first column should be modified, if necessary, to fit a National Croquet Association’s handicap range in Association Croquet.  Similar tables should be devised where other forms of croquet are commonly played.

Table B

Association Croquet Handicap

Initial Index

Initial Golf Croquet Handicap

AC world ranking grade over 2600

1000

0

-4 to -2.5

800

1

-2 to -0.5

650

2

0 to 1.5

500

3

2 to 3.

400

4

4 to 5

350

5

6 to 7

300

6

8 to 9

250

7

10

200

8

12

150

9

14 to 16

100

10

18 to 20

50

11

22 to 24

0

12

5.       When handicaps change

Golf Croquet Handicaps change when the player’s index points reach a trigger point for a handicap which is not their current handicap.  They change immediately before the next game played, even if the next game is part of the same best-of-3 or best-of-5 match.  The trigger points are shown in Table C.  Table C also shows the range of index points for which the handicap on that line does not change.

Table C

   

Handicaps

Trigger Points for this handicap

Range for which there is no change for this  handicap

0

1000

1000 to 801

1

800

999 to 651

2

650

799 to 501

3

500

649 to 401

4

400

499 to 351

5

350

399 to 301

6

300

349 to 251

7

250

299 to 201

8

200

249 to 151

9

150

199 to 101

10

100

149 to 100

11

50

99 to 50

12

0

49 to 0

The maximum index is 1,000.  The minimum index is 0.

6.       When indexes change

A player’s index normally changes after every competition game played, whether doubles or singles.

However players whose handicap is 10, 11 or 12 do not lose index points, although their successful opponents do gain index points, and players whose index is 1,000 cannot gain index points, although their unsuccessful opponents do lose index points.  Except as noted here the amounts of index change are given by paragraphs 6.1 to 6.4.

6.1     Index changes in Handicap Singles games

In handicap singles games the winner’s index increases by 10 and the loser’s index decreases by 10.

6.2     Index changes in Handicap Doubles games

In handicap doubles games the indexes of both winner’s increase by 5 points and the indexes of both losers decrease by 5 points.

6.3     Index changes in Level Singles games

In level games the winner’s index increases and the loser’s index decreases by the amount shown in Table D.

Table D

                               
               

Loser's Handicap

         
     

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

   

0

10

6

4

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

   

1

14

10

7

4

3

3

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

   

2

16

13

10

7

5

4

4

3

3

2

2

1

1

 

Winner's

3

18

16

13

10

8

7

6

5

4

4

3

3

2

 

Handicap

4

19

17

15

12

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

4

3

   

5

19

17

16

13

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

4

   

6

19

18

16

14

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

   

7

19

18

17

15

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

   

8

19

19

17

16

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

   

9

19

19

18

16

15

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

   

10

19

19

18

17

16

15

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

   

11

19

19

19

17

16

16

15

14

13

12

11

10

9

   

12

19

19

19

18

17

16

16

15

14

13

12

11

10

          Note: Players on a handicap of 10, 11 or 12, do not lose index points

6.4 Index changes in level doubles games.

In level doubles games the combined handicaps are found for each side. The difference is found, then table E shows the points gained by both winners and the points lost by both losers.

 

Table E

   

Difference in the combined handicaps

Larger combined handicaps won

Smaller combined handicaps won

0 to 3

5

5

4 to 7

6

4

8 to 11

7

3

12 to 15

8

2

16 to 24

9

1

Note: Players on a handicap of 10, 11 or 12, do not lose index points.

6.5     Record keeping

Each National Croquet Association should organise a system for keeping track of Index changes and handicap changes.  This may be through the use of index cards, tables or other means.

7.       Administration of the Golf Croquet Handicap System and Non-automatic handicap changes

Each National Croquet Association where Golf Croquet is played should appoint a National Golf Croquet Handicapper, and each club where Golf Croquet is played should appoint either a Club Golf Croquet Handicapper or Handicapping Committee.

The functions of the Club GC Handicapper would include:

  1. Set initial handicaps for new-to-croquet club members or experienced Croquet players starting to play Golf Croquet.
  2. Monitor the use of the index cards to ensure they are understood and used correctly.
  3. Watch for players whose improvement is outpacing progress on the card and recommend to the National Handicapper that a decrease in handicap be applied.  Except where a handicap is grossly wrong such changes should be by either 1 or 2, with the index set to the trigger point for the new handicap.
  4. Listen to requests for handicap extensions and make recommendations to the National GC Handicapper.  Such extensions should normally be granted only for a player returning to croquet after ill health.  Gradual deterioration in play or a return in good health should be dealt with by the automatic system.
  5. Maintain a record of Golf Croquet handicaps for club members.

The functions of the National Golf Croquet Handicapper would be to:

  1. Assist and advise the Club GC Handicappers
  2. Approve applications by Club GC Handicappers for non-automatic reductions or extensions.  Non-approval would be rare and would only follow full discussion.